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Marching For Jena 6 Justice in Louisiana

Posted by DallasBlackBlog on Thursday, September 20, 2007

10:21 AM CDT, September 20, 2007

JENA, La. – In a mile-long procession, tens of thousands of civil rights demonstrators from around the nation marched this morning from the courthouse of this racially embattled town to the schoolyard where nooses were hung from a tree last year as a warning to black students.

Chanting “No justice, no peace,” the black-clad demonstrators walked down quiet residential streets as homeowners somberly watched from their front steps, their arms crossed in front of them.

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Posted in African American, African American Education, Black, Black Education, Civil Rights, Education, Jena, Jena 6, Jena Six, Legal, Louisiana, Public Education, Race, Racism, Sherri Brokaw Dallas ISD, Urban Education | Leave a Comment »

Charles Hamilton Houston Institute Hosts Panel On Racial Integration In Public Schools

Posted by DallasBlackBlog on Sunday, September 16, 2007

September 7, 2007

king

Lawyers George Hayes,
Thurgood Marshall,
and James M. Nabrit
join hands outside
the U.S. Supreme Court
to celebrate Brown vs. Education.

The Supreme Court’s recent rulings overturning desegregation plans by school districts in Seattle and Louisville were the focus of a special panel discussion sponsored by Harvard Law School’s Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice on September 6.

In June, a sharply divided Court restricted the ability of public school districts to use race to determine which schools students can attend, a decision that could severely limit integration programs nationwide. The justices split along ideological grounds, with five justices ruling that the school placement schemes under review violated the Constitution’s guarantee of equal protection.

Like most of the analysis since the decision, the panel discussion focused on the concurring opinion filed by Justice Anthony M. Kennedy ’61, who cast the deciding vote with the court’s conservatives to strike down the school plans but specifically declined to follow key parts of the plurality opinion written by Chief Justice John Roberts, Jr. ’79.

Kennedy wrote: “Parts of the opinion by the Chief Justice imply an all-too-unyielding insistence that race cannot be a factor in instances when, in my view, it may be taken into account. The plurality opinion is too dismissive of the legitimate interest government has in ensuring all people have equal opportunity regardless of their race.

Justice Kennedy’s concurring opinion has become a source of hope for those who support racial integration efforts, said panelist Nadine Cohen, staff counsel on the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law of the Boston Bar Association. “The idea that we can be color-blind in our education policies really ignores the reality of life and race in America today,” she said. “I think Justice Kennedy has left a window open for us, and we need to climb through that window, but not by contorting desegregation programs we know have worked.”

Another panelist, Anurima Bhargava, director of the education group in the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund, said Kennedy’s opinion served as a “stop-gap” against the majority opinion, which would have otherwise gone a lot further towards outlawing desegregation efforts in public schools.

Cynthia Valenzuela, director of litigation for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund, admitted that the Court’s decision has already made it more difficult for public school districts in Arizona and California to implement desegregation policies. Latinos in particular have already faced more public school segregation since the ruling, she said.

Other panelists included: Dennis Parker from the American Civil Liberties Union, Khin Mai Aung from the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund, and john a. powell from the Kirwan Institute for Race and Ethnicity.

The panel event also commemorated Charles Hamilton Houston’s 112th Birthday. Professor Charles Ogletree, the Houston Institute’s executive director, and Charles Hamilton Houston, Jr. were on hand to unveil a portrait of the Institute’s namesake. It will hang at Harvard Law School.

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Posted in African American, African American Lawyers, American Civil Liberties Union, Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund, Black, Black Lawyers, Brown v. Board of Education, Charles Hamilton Houston, Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice, Civil Rights, Desegregation, Education, Harvard Law School, Kirwan Institute for Race and Ethnicity, Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund, NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund, Professor Charles Ogletree, Public Education, Race, Racism, Thurgood Marshall, Urban Education | Leave a Comment »

Race Cannot Be Ignored In Closing The Achievement Gap In Public Education

Posted by DallasBlackBlog on Sunday, September 16, 2007

Narrowing the achievement gap in schools requires acknowledging race, not ignoring it.

September 16, 2007

The achievement gap between African American and Latino students and their white peers is stark and persistent. It has existed for decades, and it’s growing more pronounced. The data refute what would be reassuring explanations. The gaps in reading and math test scores are not due to income disparities, nor are they attributable to parents’ educational levels. The simple fact is that most black and brown children do not do as well in school as most whites.

The data also show, however, that African American and Latino children are excelling in schools scattered throughout California and the nation, suggesting that the achievement gap is not intractable. Rather, there is a profound disconnect between what we say are high expectations for children of color and the quality of education delivered to them in the classroom.

All of which leads to an uncomfortable but important conclusion: If a less-stratified society is desirable, we must be prepared to design educational programs that explicitly take race into account, that address African American and Latino students specifically and that openly recognize that we are not a single society when it comes to the needs of our children.

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Posted in African American, African American Education, Black, Black Colleges, Black Education, Black Investors, Brown v. Board of Education, Civil Rights, Dallas ISD, DISD, Education, Education Policy, Education Reform, High-Stakes Testing, Hispanic, Legal, NCLB, No Child Left Behind, Public Education, Racism, Supreme Court, Urban Education, War | Leave a Comment »

TAVIS Smiley – Republican Presidential Candidates Ignore Minorities

Posted by DallasBlackBlog on Friday, September 14, 2007

By Jill Lawrence, USA TODAY

WASHINGTON — Three of the four leading Republican presidential candidates turned down invitations to a PBS debate this month at a historically black college in Baltimore, leading moderator Tavis Smiley on Thursday to accuse them of ignoring minority voters.

Smiley told USA TODAY the rejections are part of a pattern, noting most GOP candidates declined invitations to address several black and Hispanic groups, including a Univision debate for a Latino audience.

“No one should be elected president of this country in 2008 if they think that along the way they can ignore people of color,” said Smiley, host of radio and TV talk shows. “If you want to be president of all America, you need to speak to all Americans.”

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Posted in 08' Presidential Election, 2008 Presidential Election, African American, African American Politics, Black, Black Politics, Elections, Mitt Romney, Politics, Race, Racism, Republican, Rudy Giuliani, Senator John McCain, Tavis Smiley | 1 Comment »

St. Luke Community UMC Mobilizes To Take Buses To Protest Rally In Jena, Louisiana

Posted by DallasBlackBlog on Wednesday, September 12, 2007

 

St. Luke Community United

Methodist Church

 

 

 

 

Media Advisory

 

 

 

 

for immediate release – September 7, 2007

 

 

 

Media Contact: Vickie Washington

Email: vw4854@yahoo.com

Phone: 214.669.2708 Fax: 214-821-3791

 

 

 

 

WHAT: Journey [ 2 [ Jena St. Luke mobilizes to take Buses to Protest Rally in Jena, Louisiana

WHO: St. Luke “Community” United Methodist Church

WHEN: Thursday, Sep 20, 2007, 12:01 a.m.

WHERE: St. Luke “Community” United Methodist Church

5710 East RL Thornton Frwy.–(I-30 East)

Dallas, TX 75223

 

 

 

 

Call this # to book passage on the bus 214-821-2970

COST: Bus is $35.00 per person, round trip

 

 

 

 

EVENT: St. Luke “Community” United Methodist Church has mobilized to Journey 2 Jena. Two buses have been chartered to take over 100 people to the Protest Rally in Jena, Louisiana, where thousands are anticipated to convene to demand Justice and Freedom for the Jena 6. Persons interested in securing a seat on the bus, should call the church office at 214.821.2970. Please go to Journey 2 Jena Yahoo Group for updates regarding seat availability.

 

 

 

 

Prior to the trip, on Wednesday evening, September 19th at 6pm,

there will be a Citywide Prayer Meeting and Rally. The offering

collected will be donated to the Jena 6 Defense Fund.

.

PHOTO

OPPS: All events open to media photographers.

 

 

A church reaching up to GOD and out into the Community.

Jesus saves and liberates us for discipleship in the community.

 
Houston Millions More Movement
jena >

Posted in African American, Black, Civil Rights, Criminal Justice, Jena 6, Jena Six, Legal, NAACP, Race, Racism, St. Luke Community UMC | Leave a Comment »

NAACP Coordinates Activities Around Mychal Bell’s Jena Six Sentencing on Sept. 20

Posted by DallasBlackBlog on Wednesday, September 12, 2007

America rallies as Bell, other defendants face lengthy prison sentences

September 10 , 2007

The NAACP is working with numerous groups, individuals, local, state and federal officials to coordinate demonstration activities related to Mychal Bell’s sentencing in two weeks. A march, rally and town hall meeting are being planned for that day.

Thousands are expected to converge on Jena, La. and the LaSalle Parish Courthouse Sept. 20 as defendant Mychal Bell is sentenced for his role in an altercation with a classmate following a series of racial incidents in the town of 3,000 after three nooses were hung in a tree at the local high school.

In the last year, Bell, 17, who remains incarcerated, and five others– Robert Bailey Jr., 17; Theo Shaw, 17; Carwin Jones, 18; Bryant Purvis, 17; and a minor–faced overly aggressive prosecution, extended incarceration and are being charged with serious criminal conduct offenses that could lead to many years of imprisonment.

On Sept. 20, “March on Jena” participants are asked to convene at Ward 10 Recreation Park in Jena starting at 7 a.m. where instructions for the day will be given. Prayers will follow the 8:15 a.m. march to the courthouse before the judicial proceedings begin. Following the sentencing a support rally will be held at the park around 11 a.m. That evening a town hall meeting focusing on education and criminal justice disparities in the U.S. will be held at 7 p.m. in Alexandria, La.

NAACP officials will present petitions to Louisiana Gov. Kathleen B. Blanco at Noon on Sept. 19 at the State Capitol. The thousands of signatures are a symbol of those across the nation that are concerned with the unequal treatment of the defendants and the disturbing climate that led to an escalation of events in the southern town. Individuals are urged to sign the petition found online at http://www.naacp.org up until that time.

The NAACP has gathered a team of pro bono attorneys to assist in Bell’s appeal and the defense of the remaining young men. Activity updates and information on contributing to the Jena 6 Legal Defense Fund can be found online at www.naacp.org or by calling toll free (888) 362-8683.

Founded in 1909, the NAACP is the nation’s oldest and largest civil rights organization. Its members throughout the United States and the world are the premier advocates for civil rights in their communities, conducting voter mobilization and monitoring equal opportunity in the public and private sectors.

TAKE ACTION

Posted in African American, African American Lawyers, Black, Civil Rights, Criminal Justice, Legal, Race, Racism | Leave a Comment »

National Attention on Jena Six

Posted by DallasBlackBlog on Wednesday, September 12, 2007

The racially charged case of six black teenagers charged with attacking a white student in the small town of Jena, La., has stirred nationwide attention, with civil rights leaders planning to attend protests next week and well-known lawyers taking an interest in the case.

After a jailhouse meeting with Mychal Bell, one of the defendants in the case, The Rev. Jesse Jackson told ABC News Monday that charges against the six boys — dubbed the “Jena Six” — should be dropped or reduced to misdemeanors.

“We want the Jena Six freed and sent to school and not to jail,” he said, urging white and black residents of the mostly white town to peacefully work out their differences. “They should forgive, reconcile, redeem and move on. Instead you have these mounting tensions.”

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Posted in African American, Al Sharpton, Black, Civil Rights, Congressional Black Caucus, Criminal Justice, Jena Six, Jesse Jackson, Legal, NAACP, Race, Racism, Southern Poverty Law Center | Leave a Comment »

NAACP Landmark Discriminatory Lending Lawsuit

Posted by DallasBlackBlog on Thursday, August 23, 2007

The NAACP filed suit in Los Angeles federal court against 14 of the country’s largest lenders, alleging systematic, institutionalized racism in sub-prime home mortgage lending. This is the first known lawsuit that challenges such lending practices on a broad scale. The suit was announced at the NAACP’s 98th annual convention, themed “Power Beyond Measure,” in Detroit through July 12.

According to the lawsuit, African American homeowners who received sub-prime mortgage loans from these lenders were more than 30 percent more likely to be issued a higher rate loan than Caucasian borrowers with the same qualifications.

“We are asking our members and all African American borrowers who bought or refinanced a home in the last five years to come forward and tell us their stories or at least re-examine their mortgages,” said NAACP National Board of Directors Chairman Julian Bond. “They can help us correct these egregious, demoralizing practices that too often turn the so-called American dream of homeownership into a nightmare.”

Other studies cited in the lawsuit demonstrate that disparities are pervasive. In fact, upper income African Americans are more than twice as likely to receive higher cost loans as their lower income white counterparts. Just this morning, USA Today reported that the National Community Reinvestment Coalition’s most recent study underscores this point, finding that discrimination against minorities persists in mortgage lending. The Federal Reserve Board, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the FDIC have all made similar observations.

“Lenders named in the suit, on average, made high cost sub-prime loans to higher qualified African Americans 54 percent of the time, compared to 23 percent of the time for Caucasians,” said NAACP Interim President & CEO Dennis Courtland Hayes.

Mortgage lenders named in the lawsuit include: Ameriquest, Fremont Investment & Loan, Option One, WMC Mortgage, Long Beach Mortgage, Citigroup, BNC Mortgage, Accredited Home Lenders, Encore Credit, Bear Sterns First Franklin Financial, HSBC Finance and Washington Mutual.

“The NAACP is bringing this suit as part of its longstanding demand that offending lenders stop discriminatory practices and bring their activities into compliance with federal law including the Fair Housing Act, the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, and the Civil Rights Act,” said NAACP Interim General Counsel Angela Ciccolo.

Even when creditworthiness and other risk characteristics are accounted for, African Americans are still significantly more likely to get higher rate loans. According to the lawsuit, these statistical disparities are not mere coincidences, but instead are a result of systematic and predatory targeting of African-Americans borrowers.

“My credit record warrants a better interest rate,” said Amara Weaver of the Waukesha County NAACP in Wisconsin, whose mortgage was shifted to a sub-prime lender immediately after closing on a property in her neighborhood that had been a drug den. “As a professional if I get treated that way, I know those who are less fortunate are victimized more often. This situation lets me know I can’t expect equal treatment and that is frustrating.”

“It’s extremely frustrating,” added Michelle Allison of the NAACP’s Merced Branch in California’s Central Valley. She refinanced with a major lender and was locked into a prepayment loan and now owes $100,000 above what she initially requested. “It’s like being over a barrel. I just wanted to be treated fairly and receive the best service. I was not given options or enough information for me to make an alternate decision. I want to get back to where I was financially before I received my loan.”

NAACP branches across the nation are addressing the predatory lending issue. In Michigan, the Detroit branch’s executive director Heaster Wheeler chairs the state’s Predatory Lending Task Force. He and others have met with Gov. Jennifer Granholm who has instructed the state insurance and banking commissioner as well the state’s civil rights office to coordinate with the branch to craft further legislation and use their authority more strictly to enforce current laws. The Washington, D.C. Branch has partnered with the American Association of Retired Persons. Through workshops, seminars, church meetings and other gatherings it has been discovered that the typical predatory lending victim in that city is an elderly African American female who is single and on social security. They are encouraged to refinance for home improvements and other reasons. The NAACP’s Connecticut State Conference has a committee to address predatory lending issues and has been actively engaged in assisting individuals in their cases. They are also encouraging legislative action and are conducting community education initiatives.

In addition to the NAACP’s Legal Department, the organization and the proposed class of its members are represented by Feazell & Tighe LLP of Austin and Kabatek Brown Kellner LLP of Los Angeles and the law office of Gary L. Bledsoe.

Founded in 1909, the NAACP is the nation’s oldest and largest civil rights organization. Its members throughout the United States and the world are the premier advocates for civil rights in their communities, conducting voter mobilization and monitoring equal opportunity in the public and private sectors.

Posted in African American, Announcements, Civil Rights, Financial, Law, Mortgage, NAACP, Predatory Lending, Race, Racism, Real Estate | Leave a Comment »

Unique Exploration Of Racism, Reparation And Healing – Repairing the Quilt of Humanity

Posted by DallasBlackBlog on Tuesday, August 21, 2007

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 21, 2007
CONTACT:
Deborah Howard
Guiding Change Consulting
718-857-6830
debhoward@guidingchange.org


UNIQUE EXPLORATION OF RACISM, REPARATION AND HEALING


Bookcover

Author – Deborah Howard

Brooklyn, NY (BlackNews.com) – Transformative Change Facilitator Deborah Howard has written Repairing the Quilt of Humanity: A Metaphor for Healing and Reparation, a book with a unique perspective on racism, its damaging impact on both people of color and white people, and what needs to happen for healing to begin.

“A rare account of one white woman’s journey to understanding some of the issues that perpetuate racism in America. Deborah Howard’s unique perspective provides critical insight into racism’s complexities — a MUST read,” said Frederick A. Miller, CEO of The Kaleel Jamison Consulting Group, Inc. and co-author of The Inclusion Breakthrough and managing editor of The Promise of Diversity.

Using the metaphor of a quilt and the Jewish concept of tikkun olam, – healing and repairing the world – Ms. Howard provides us with insight and an innovative approach to understanding and making visible sources of systemic injustice, the way social inequities are perpetuated, the significant psychological damage that results, and the transformation necessary for healing and forgiveness.

For a review copy of the book or to set up speaking engagements, contact:

Deborah Howard
Guiding Change Consulting
718-857-6830
debhoward@guidingchange.org
www.guidingchange.org

Available on Amazon (type in Repairing the Quilt) or on order from bookstores
Paperback: 100 pages
$10.95
Beckham Publications Group (July 1, 2006)
Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 5 x 0.3 inches
ISBN 0931761123


About the Author
Deborah Howard, Esq., M.S.O.D., founder of Guiding Change Consulting is a transformative change facilitator and life-long learner whose life purpose is to enable positive transformative change in others and continue her own learning and growth in the process. She is dedicated to helping individuals, teams, and organizations maximize their potential, enhance their effectiveness, and create and maintain work environments that are inclusive and just.

Her professional life began in the field of law. After receiving her Bachelor of Arts Degree from Harvard University, she went on to receive a law degree from Northeastern University School of Law. She went to law school with the goal of using the law to help create positive social change. After litigating in the public services area for a number of years both in Anchorage, Alaska and New York City, she became disillusioned with the adversarial process. Rather than taking sides in win-lose scenarios, she wanted to find ways to work with people to help them build and maintain connections. It was that desire that led her to return to school to receive her Masters Degree in Organization Development from American University/NTL.

Deborah’s background and training also includes a Certificate in Culturally Competent Human Services from the Temple University Multicultural Research and Training Institute as well as coursework in human interaction and diversity at the NTL Institute for Applied Behavioral Science of which she is a member.


-END-

Posted in African American, Announcements, Authors, Black, Civil Rights, New Books, Race, Racism, Reparation | Leave a Comment »

National Black And Brown Re-Entry Summit Agenda

Posted by DallasBlackBlog on Sunday, August 19, 2007

THE NATIONAL BLACK-BROWN SUMMIT ON RE-ENTRY & RECIDIVISM
AUGUST 19-22, 2007
THE ADAMS MARK HOTEL
DALLAS, TEXAS.
________________________________________________________________________________

Sunday, August 19

4:00 – 7:00 pm On-site Registration
6:00 – 8:00 pm Opening Reception

************************************************************************************
Monday, August 20

7:30 am – 8:30 am Continental Breakfast

8:00 am Continued Registration (all day)

9:00 am – 10:30 am Opening Plenary

Presiding: Carmelita Pope Freeman, Regional Director, U.S. Department of Justice, Community Relations Service

Richard H. Jacques/ CEO, Second Chance Education Development.

Invocation: Bishop Charles Bledsoe, CEO National Church Empowerment Consortium

Greetings: Richard Roper, U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas

Welcome:

Dr. Elba Garcia, Mayor Pro Tem

Dr. Wright Lassiter Jr., Chancellor
Dallas County Community College District

Rosa Rosales, LULAC President

Dennis Hayes, President and CEO, NAACP

Keynote Speaker: The Honorable Danny K. Davis, U.S.
Congressman from Chicago; Author, Second Chance
Act of 2007

10:30 am – 12:00 pm CONCURRENT PANELS

1. The Second Chance Act: Its Impact on Federal, State & Local Agencies

Moderator:

Richard H. Jacques/Second Chance Education-Development

Panelists:

David Robison, Proactive Approaches to Community Supervision, CROSS

Gary Bledsoe, Attorney and Member of NAACP National Board; Former Texas NAACP President (Invited)

Congressman Danny K. Davis, 7th District Illinois, Second Chance Act

2. Re-entry: Homelessness, Housing Assistance & Other Support Services

Moderator:

Roman Palomares, Chairman, Homeward Bound; Former LULAC Chief of Staff; and, LULAC National Housing Commission Member

Panelists:

Tina Naidoo, Program Director of Texas Offenders Re-entry Initiative
Crystal City Representative

David Robison, The Ex-Offender Mortgage Program (TEMP)

3. Juvenile & the Re-entry Process: Issues & Concerns

Moderator:

Durrand Hill, Chief Prosecutor – Juvenile, Dallas County District Attorney’s Office

Panelists:

Israel Pena, Phoenix Project, Gang Intervention

Mike Griffiths, Director, Dallas County Juvenile Detention Center

4. Ensuring Success for Male Students at Cedar Valley and Mountain
View College

Moderator:

Leonard Garrett, Ph.D., Vice President of Student Support Services and Enrollment Management, Mountain View College, DCCCD

Panelist:

Jonas Young, Director of Testing Serices at Cedar Valley College, DCCCD

Joel Riley, Counselor and Professor of Human Development at Cedar Valley College, DCCCD

Raymond Lee, Director of ASSET Program, Mountain View College, DCCCD

12:00 pm – 2:00 pm LUNCH

Presiding: Rene Martinez, Dallas Independent School District

Invocation: Pastor Larry Gardner, Potters House

Greetings: Roberto Alonzo, State Representative

Vicki Hallman, Regional Director, Dallas Parole Division,
Texas Department of Criminal Justice

Rafael Anchia, State Representative

Introduction to Speaker: Dianne Gibson, Community Courts Program Manager, Office of the City Attorney Dallas Community Courts
Keynote Speaker: Craig Watkins, Dallas County District Attorney

2:00 pm – 3:30 pm CONCURRENT PANELS

5. Black/Brown Issues for Re-entry, Similarities/Differences, Community

Moderator:

Hector Flores, Immediate Past President, LULAC; Head of Minority Recruitment, Dallas Independent School District

Panelists:

Adelfa Callejo, Attorney; Chairwoman, Dallas Hispanic Coalition

Gary Bledsoe, Attorney and Member of NAACP National Board; Former Texas NAACP President (Invited)

Will Harrell, Chief Ombudsman, Texas Youth Commission; Former Director of Texas ACLU

Michael Lee, CEO Operation Oasis/CROSS

6. Overcoming the Barriers for the Returning Felon: Education & Employment

Moderator:

Edward Elizondo, LULAC District III Civil Rights Committee Chair; EEOC Outreach Program Manager, Retired

Panelist:

Charles Dillon, Program Director Operation Oasis/CROSS

Katrina Eddins, Project Rio, Texas Worksource

Joan Sanger, Career Edge Systems

7. Life Guide America, Making Good Choices

Moderator:

Treva McDaniel, Program Director, North Central Texas Urban League

Panelist:

Robert Pitre, CEO Life Guide America

8. Best Practices: Getting Offenders Back on Track- The Prosecutors Role In Re-entry

Moderator:

Chikita Tatum, Director Mercy Inc.

Panelist:

Lateefah Simon, Director-San Francisco District Attorney’s Office, Re-entry Unit

Paul Henderson, Assistant District Attorney, San Francisco District Attorney’s Office

9. El Centro/ Bill J. Priest –Employment, Education, Enrichment for the Offender Population

Moderator:

Clifton White, Parole Supervisor, Dallas Parole Division, Texas Department of Criminal Justice

Panelist:

Leslie Shelby, Ed.D., Dean of Instruction, Bill J. Priest Institute

Chuck Waldrop, Director Center for Government Contracting-SBDC
Bill J. Priest Institute

Roderick Caples, Community Job Developer
City of Dallas Offender Re-entry Initiative

4:00 pm – 6:00 pm Tour A –
Texas Department of Criminal Justice-Day Resource Center
1010 Cadiz, Dallas, Texas 75215

Community Resource One-Stop System (CROSS) Re-entry Program
1402 Corinth Street, Dallas, Texas 75215

************************************************************************************
Tuesday, August 21

7:30 am – 8:30 am Continental Breakfast

8:00 am Continued Registration (all day)

9:00 am – 10:30 am Opening Plenary

Presiding: Richard Sambrano, LULAC TX Civil Rights Committee Chair

Invocation: Bishop Charles Bledsoe, CEO National Church Empowerment Consortium

Greetings: Lupe Valdez, Dallas County Sheriff

David Kunkle, Chief, Dallas Police Department

Terri Hodge, Texas State Representative

Speaker: Gerardo Maldonado, Regional Director, U.S. Bureau of Prisons

Speaker: Madeline Ortiz, Director for Rehabilitation and Re-entry Programs Division, Texas Department of Criminal Justice

10:30 am – 12:00 pm CONCURRENT PANELS

10. Basic Civil Rights & the Returning Felons

Moderator:

Richard Sambrano, Texas State LULAC Civil Rights Committee Chair; Retired Mediator from the U.S. Department of Justice, Community Relations Service

Panelists:

Will Harrell, Chief Ombudsman, Texas Youth Commission; Former Director of Texas ACLU

Jeff Blackburn, Innocence Project Attorney, Amarillo, Texas (Invited)

John Walker, Desegregation and Civil Rights Attorney, Little Rock, Arkansas (Invited)

11. Re-entry Program: Addressing the Underlying Issues – Substance Abuse & Mental Illness

Moderator:

Shalonda Richardson-Grant, Specialized Parole Officer, Texas Youth Commission

Panelists:

The Honorable Jerry Cruzotte, Judge

The Honorable Robert Frances, Judge

Michael Laughlin, Senior U.S. Probation/Pretrial Services Officer/Offender Workforce Development Specialist, U.S. Probation/Pretrial Services Office of the Northern District of Texas

12. Influence of Gangs on the Returning Felon to the Community

Moderator:

Heath Harris, Chief Prosecutor – Gang Violence, Dallas County District Attorney’s Office

Panelists:

Ernesto Chaplin, Director Ernesto Lucio Ministries

Cornelius Moore, Unit Supervisor, Dallas Parole Division, Texas Department of Criminal Justice

Amy Allen, Dallas Gang Initiative, City Attorney Office, City of Dallas

13. Best Practices: Prison Fellowship

Moderator:

David Robison, CROSS Representative

Panelist:

William Anderson, Arizona State Director Prison Fellowship, Operation SOAR

12:00 pm – 2:00 pm LUNCH

Presiding: Gloria Campos, Channel 8 Anchor

Invocation: Pastor Larry Gardner, Potters House

Speakers: The Honorable Lena Levario, Judge Criminal District Court

Royce West, Texas Senator from Dallas

Introduction of Speaker: Michael Lee, CEO Operation Oasis/CROSS

Keynote Speaker: Mark Early, President and CEO of Prison Fellowship Ministries, Former State Senator and Attorney General for State of Virginia

2:00 pm – 3:30 pm CONCURRENT PANELS

14. Women and the Re-entry Process: F 3-Females, First & Foremost

Moderator:

Ana Yanez Correa, Director of the Texas Criminal Justice Policy Coalition

Panelists:

Evelyn Schaffer, Assistant Regional Director, Parole Division, Texas Department of Criminal Justice

Andrenett Hayes-Jones, Parole Supervisor, Parole Division, Texas Department of Criminal Justice

15. Criminal Justice Sentencing & Supervision & Their Role in Recidivism

Moderator:

Gaylord Thomas, Manager, City of Dallas Offender Re-entry Initiative

Panelists:

The Honorable Lena Levario, Judge District Court 104

Jeff Blackburn, Innocence Project Attorney, Amarillo, Texas (Invited)

Gwen Broadnax, Dallas Probation – Outreach Coordinator

16. CROSS/Homeward Bound/City of Dallas Offender Re-entry Initiative/Dallas County Community College District Re-entry Program

Moderator:

Roman Palomares, Chairman, Homeward Bound; Former LULAC Chief of Staff; and, LULAC National Housing Commission Member

Panelists:

David Robison, CROSS Representative

Richard H. Jacques, CEO Second Chance Education Development

Gaylord Thomas, Manager, City of Dallas Re-entry Initiative

17. Best Practices: Washington, D.C. Re-entry Initiative

Moderator:

Fred Jones, Victory 2000

Panelist:

Rahim Jenkins, Director, Washington, D.C. Re-entry Initiative

18. The Job Lead Generator-Workforce Re-entry Initiative

Moderator:

Chris Pipkin, Operation Oasis/CROSS

Panelist:

Victor Pratt, Director Job Lead Generator

4:00 pm – 6:00 pm Tour B (if needed)

************************************************************************************

Wednesday, August 22

8:00 am – 10:00 am LEGISLATIVE BREAKFAST

Moderator:

Ana Yanez Correa, Director of Texas Criminal Justice Policy Coalition

Speakers:

Jerry Madden, Texas State Representative

Terri Hodge, Texas State Representative

Yvonne Davis, Texas State Representative

10:00 am – 12:00 pm Summit Summary & Analysis

Presiding: Carmelita Pope Freeman, Regional Director, U.S. Department of Justice, Community Relations Service

Posted in African American, Black, Civil Rights, Congressional Black Caucus, Hispanic, LULAC, NAACP, NABSW, Race, Racism, U. S. Department of Justice | Leave a Comment »